An Interior Designer’s Guide to Healthcare Furniture

Posted by Janet Voigt on Mon, Sep 18, 2017 @ 01:00 PM
Interior Designer for Contract Furniture
Recently I was talking to an interior designer who took her first healthcare design job. This particular interior designer had a lot of residential experience but when I asked her about selecting contract-grade furniture, she was totally unaware that there was furniture designed for non-residential applications.
 
While the elements of good residential interior design might translate well into a commercial healthcare or group living environment, the furniture and fixtures do not.
 
Bland, sterile-looking healthcare facilities are a thing of the past. Aesthetics now encompass a broad range of healing elements including energetic color-schemes and nature-based hues that encourage comfort. But beyond the basics of color is a new world of functionality.
 
Furniture and fixtures for health care and healing environments must also prevent falls, encourage mobility, discreetly deal with incontinence and fluids, maintain sterile surfaces and support the latest patient-centered technologies.
 
So what exactly is contract-grade furniture? 
Read More

Topics: Interior Design Advice of Group Living Facilities, Contract Furniture, Behavioral Healthcare Furniture

What You Need to Look for in Furniture for Adults with Disabilities

Posted by Janet Voigt on Thu, Jul 14, 2016 @ 08:00 AM

There really isn’t a “one size fits all” option for furniture. Finding the right furniture options for a facility depends on the people that will end up using those chairs, tables, and other furnishings. When it comes to ordering group living and health care furniture that encourages maximum independence, your furniture needs to combine both style and substance.

Read More

Topics: Behavioral Healthcare Furniture, Limited Mobility Furniture

Five Furniture Styles for Behavioral Health Environments

Posted by Karyl Walker on Thu, Jun 09, 2016 @ 08:00 AM
Behavioral healthcare organizations have very specific needs for their furniture. Safety is a huge concern for psychiatric facilities and other related areas as behavioral health patients are at a greater risk of self-harm and other dangerous acts.

However, cold, uninviting institutional-like furnishings can have a negative effect on patients, which is why healthcare practitioners should look for residential-style contract furniture can make a facility a much more comfortable environment. Here are five quality furniture styles that can be the right fit behavioral healthcare facilities.
Read More

Topics: Behavioral Healthcare Furniture

Limited Mobility & Incontinence Furniture

Posted by Janet Voigt on Tue, May 13, 2014 @ 09:03 PM

Furniture Solutions for People with Limited Mobility & Incontinence.

Seniors and others with limited mobility benefit from specialized seating for comfort, ease of use and safety. 
Facilities that specialize in the care of limited mobility clients and patients tend to pattern seating in common areas like that of a residence – clustered to encourage socialization, allow easy TV viewing, or to make group activities easier. 
While furniture arrangement may mirror residential, the furniture itself requires special considerations.  Contract furniture sellers offer specialized seating pieces designed to offer maximum benefit to anyone with limited mobility and or incontinence. 

Here are a few modifications that can make seating an asset to your limited mobility consumers:

  • Arms.  Arms on chairs are a necessity for those with limited mobility as they provide extra support for transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. 
  • Seat Height.  Seniors and others with limited mobility often suffer from reduced muscle tone.  In these cases, seat height must be higher to enable the extension of the knee from the sitting to standing position.  Seat Height should range from 20” to 22”.
  • Seat Depth.  A shorter seat depth also aids in the transition from sitting to standing.  Seat depth should range from 20” to 22”.
  • Cushion Firmness.  All seating pieces intended for use by individuals with limited mobility should have a cushion since the person tends to stay seated for extended periods of time.  A cushion should not be so soft that it creates an obstacle for standing but should not be so hard that it is uncomfortable for extended use.
  • Other Considerations.  Fabric and other design enhancements can add to the comfort and function of seating for those with limited mobility.  Limited mobility and incontinence tend to go hand in hand.  Fabrics such as Crypton© offer a high-degree of fluid-resistance and can protect upholstered furniture from odor and staining.  In addition, pop-out and clean out seat designs encourage fluids away from the client and the furniture. Caregivers and staff can easily access fluid clean-ups which are forced to the floor.
  • Bariatric Seating: Bariatric furniture includes a wide variety of wood, metal and upholstered seating pieces that are designed and tested to hold up to heavier weights then standard furniture pieces. Wider seats. Extra heavy duty construction. Stronger Frames.

Beyond common area seating, dining seating also requires specialized functionality and design. 

Dining chairs should have upholstered seats for comfort.  Just as with living room seating, shorter seat height and depth is effective for dining chairs.  In addition, dining chairs with casters on the rear legs only can add stability for transitioning from sitting to standing while allowing clients and patients additional freedom while seated.  Pulling up to the table becomes substantially easier when the rear legs have casters.
  
Read More

Topics: Bariatric, Furniture For Incontinence, Behavioral Healthcare Furniture

6 Tips for the Greatest Heavy Use Furniture Ever

Posted by Janet Voigt on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 @ 03:43 PM
Managers and executives in group living environments - from university housing to group homes - agree that the one of biggest challenges they have is buying furniture that is tougher than their clients.
Read More

Topics: Contract Furniture, Group Furniture Buying Advice, Behavioral Healthcare Furniture, heavy use furniture

Subscribe to Email Updates

About Us!

Furniture Concepts

For 20+ years, Furniture Concepts has remained committed to providing furniture Solutions for any type of group living environment. We sell only Business to Business in U.S.A. and Canada. Furniture Concepts is known for: Durability. Pricing. Deadlines. Customer Service... Learn More about us!

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all